Actually, you get to.

There’s a difference between “have to” and “get to” and it’s important. What you think and how you speak about a thing greatly affects your attitude. It’s ridiculously easy to skew towards the negative in life and labelling everything a “have to” ensures that. Making everything an obligation means you’ll likely spend a fair amount of time complaining. It’s better to remember you have a choice...

Actually, you get to.

There’s a difference between “have to” and “get to” and it’s important. What you think and how you speak about a thing greatly affects your attitude. It’s ridiculously easy to skew towards the negative in life and labelling everything a “have to” ensures that. Making everything an obligation means you’ll likely spend a fair amount of time complaining. It’s better to remember you have a choice...

Trying to be a better person.

I’m trying to become a better person. Part of the reason is to atone. I spent a great many years being not a good person. It’s a feature of eating disorders. They make you selfish and insular and shortsighted. I regret, greatly, a great many of the things I said and did when my eating disorder was at my worst. I would like, very much, to be a better person in the future. So, I decided to actively work on it...

Is it selfish?

People like to call you selfish when you aren’t doing what they want. It causes a conundrum. You need to think of yourself, to take care of yourself, but when does doing so cross the line into selfishness? When do you get to put yourself first? It’s a question I’ve been struggling with...

A rise in escapism.

Three hundred hours of video are upload to YouTube every minute, and 317,000 status updates are posted on Facebook. Netflix users spent one hundred and forty million hours a day watching content. Hulu and other streaming services are growing. Social media platforms are expanding. We’re all looking at the screens, all captivated by images and posts and tweets and pictures of baby animals. Time becomes meaningless. Planned minutes on the TV or computer or phone become hours. We never look up. We rarely look away. What then, are we missing? What don’t we see?...